Nutritional

Supersimple Switches When Eating Out

Supersimple Switches When Eating Out

As Americans, we spend nearly half of our food budget on foods prepared away from home and consume about one-third of our calories on those foods.  When we walk into a restaurant, we are faced with menus loaded with high-calorie, high-sodium options.  In addition to sharing an entrée, wrapping up half your meal to take home and just being mindful of how much food is on your plate, you can try these supersimple switches to eat healthier at your favorite restaurant. American Start with a house salad with dressing on the side instead of a Caesar salad. Order grilled instead of fried chicken or fish entrees. Choose a baked potato instead of French fries. Order steamed or sautéed vegetables instead of potatoes in gravy. Order a veggie burger instead of a cheeseburger. Chinese Choose steamed instead of fried dumplings Order steamed brown rice instead of fried rice Order entrees steamed or lightly sautéed, instead of fried. Order

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Supersimple Switches for Your Recipes

Supersimple Switches for Your Recipes

Applesauce for Oil, Butter or Sugar – Applesauce is a healthy cook’s best friend. Not only does it add sweetness to recipes, but it does it with fewer calories than sugar. And without butter, you’re cutting the saturated-fat content of things like muffins, breads and brownies. Not to mention the added dietary benefits of the fiber in apples. Nonfat Greek Yogurt for Mayo or Sour Cream – Nonfat Greek yogurt has a lot less calories and fat than mayonnaise or sour cream, but its consistency is very similar. Next time a recipe calls for either of those fattening ingredients, try using the yogurt instead. You can cut the fat while adding an extra punch of protein. Mashed Bananas for Sugar, Butter and Fats – Sliced bananas are yummy in cereals and oatmeal, but they can also be used in the kitchen as a sugar, butter and fat substitute in baking. Bananas are also high in potassium, which helps

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Supersimple Switches that Trick You Into Eating Healthier

Supersimple Switches that Trick You Into Eating Healthier

Switch the Order.  When dining out, be the first one to order. You’ll be less likely to change your mind after hearing what others are having.  Switch Sides.  A recent study showed that if you eat with your non-dominant hand, you can reduce what you eat by 30% because it breaks up that automatic hand-to-mouth flow. If you have trouble slowing down, put your utensil in your other hand. It’s inconvenient, it’s awkward, and you cannot go fast. Switch Your Shakers.  Fill your salt shaker with pepper and your pepper shaker with salt. Since salt shakers have more holes, this supersimple switch will help to slash your sodium intake.  Switch Your Speed.  A Japanese study found that faster eaters gained an average of 4.2 pounds over 8 years, while slower eaters gained only 1.5 pounds. Switch Your Latte to a Tea.  Research shows L-theanine, an amino acid in tea, reduces feelings of stress and increases

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Tips for Perfectly Grilled Chicken

Perfectly grilled chicken with crisp, browned skin and juicy, succulent meat is relatively simple if you learn to manipulate the heat. First, establish two temperature zones: Set one side of a gas grill to medium-high and the other to low or build a fire on one side of a charcoal grill. (Make sure your grate is clean and oiled to prevent sticking.) Then, start the chicken skin-side up on the low or no-heat side and cover the grill. After a few minutes when the chicken fat starts to render, flip the meat skin-side down. Point the breasts’ thicker ends toward the hot side to help them cook evenly. Last, cover and grill for about 25 minutes. When the meat is done (165° at the thickest part of the breast), crisp the skin on the hot side for a minute or two, moving it as needed to avoid flare-ups.   Note–Wait until the last

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Food Label Words That Sound Healthy…But Are They?

Food Label Words That Sound Healthy...But Are They?

Food labels can be designed to make you think the product is healthy.  Surveys have shown that the majority of Americans say they think these labels are helpful in making healthy food choices.  Some claims are defined by the Food and Drug Administration, but manufacturers are always coming up with new ones that aren’t regulated, even if you happen to know what those definitions are.  Here are a few that can be misleading: Natural What it sounds like it means: It’s not processed. What it really means:  It might not contain added colors, artificial flavors or synthetic substances. The FDA hasn’t been able to agree on a definition for “natural” labels. What you should do:  See how long the ingredients list is. The fewer the ingredients, the less processed the food generally is. Lightly Sweetened What it sounds like it means:  It has very little sugar. What it really means:  It could still have

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Supersimple Switches to Cut Calories

Supersimple Switches to Cut Calories

The most effective weight-loss strategy doesn’t require you to abandon the foods you love, just make a few supersimple switches.  Do that and you’ll trade diets and weight fluctuations for healthy eating patterns and a healthier you.  Who wouldn’t make that switch? Make your sandwich open-faced. (Save 100 calories.) Top 8 crackers with one cup of apple slices, instead of cheese. (Save 100 calories.) Choose a fresh spring roll instead of a fried egg roll. (Save 100 calories.) Eat chocolate sorbet instead of chocolate ice cream. (Save 140 calories per ½ cup.) Skip the crust on apple pie. (Save 100 calories.) Swap pepperoni on your pizza for veggies, such as fresh tomatoes and peppers. (Save 100 calories per two slices.) Use a 6-inch flour tortilla instead of a 10-inch on your next burrito. (Save 120 calories.) Eat a whole wheat English muffin at breakfast instead of a bagel. (Save 150

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Healthy Eating 101 (Part III)

Healthy Eating 101 (Part III)

Basic tips for eating healthy! Raid Your Spice Rack Studies indicate that cinnamon may help regulate blood sugar, turmeric may help prevent Alzheimer’s, and oregano may possess cancer-preventive properties. Sprinkle cinnamon on your latte, curry powder on your sauteed veggies, and big handfuls of herbs on salads and in pasta sauces. Check out the Back of the Box The front of any food product is where marketers stick claims like “natural,” “low-fat,” and “no added sugar”—all of which con’t necessarily mean anything. The true test of the quality of the product is the ingredients list and the nutrition facts panel. Learn how to read those. Get in the Grains Make big batches of oatmeal, brown rice, and quinoa on the weekend and store them in the fridge.  When you need them for breakfast or side dishes during the week, just heat them up in the microwave and they’re ready to

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Healthy Eating 101 (Part I)

Healthy Eating 101 (Part I)

Basic tips for eating healthy! Pucker Up Lemon can be your secret weapon.  Squeeze lemon  juice or sprinkle the zest of a lemon over vegetables instead of using extra oil, butter, or salt. You can saute spinach with just a teaspoon of oil, and then add a little lemon juice for a lot of flavor without a lot of calories. Taste the Rainbow When you look at a plate, you should see lots of color.  There should be a full spectrum, since differently colored produce offers different antioxidants.” Embrace Your Hidden Vegetarian For the sake of your health and your waistline, vegetables should be the bulk of your meals, and there’s almost nobody out there who couldn’t benefit from eating more of them.  Instead of a huge slab of some animal protein and a little side of veggies, do a small piece of fish or meat on a plateful of vegetables.

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Healthy Eating 101 (Part II)

Healthy Eating 101 (Part II)

Basic tips for eating healthy! Turn off the Stove That’s right—shut down the heat a full three minutes before you think you should. Overcooking removes flavor and nutrients. The food will keep cooking for a while after you remove it from the stove or oven, so let it sit a few minutes before serving. Use Real Food Use organic sugar instead of sugar substitutes, fresh fruits and vegetables instead of processed foods.  If God made it, it has to be better for you. Think Before You Drink The average person consumes more than 400 calories a day from beverages and that includes about 10 teaspoons of added sugar from soft drinks. Swap out juice and soda for no-cal drinks like unsweetened tea and water, you could lose up to 40 pounds in a year. Stash a Snack If you’re carrying something that’s healthy and portion controlled, you can head off

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3 Easy Ways to Cook Carrots

3 Easy Ways to Cook Carrots

CARROTS ARE A NUTRITIONAL POWERHOUSE Carrots are not only tasty — they’re really good for you. Carrots are loaded with beta carotene, which helps maintain healthy eyesight. They also contain fiber, natural sugars, folic acid, potassium, calcium and magnesium. With all these nutrients, you should munch on carrots whenever you get the chance. In raw form, carrots are crunchy and slightly sweet. Eat them alone or with a dip; serve them as an appetizer or a snack. You can even grate them and add them to salads, sandwiches, cakes or cookies. If these combinations aren’t enough for you, don’t worry: With so many ways to cook them, you’ll never run out of new things to try. Here are a just a few ways to enjoy them: MASHED Mashed carrots make an excellent side dish and are great for a casual dinner or for a holiday feast. Aside from that, they’re

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