The Joy of Hospitality

Hospitality and entertaining are not the same thing, even though we often think of them as interchangeable. Hospitality is a practice. It is always being ready to help—even if your house is a mess. It’s giving, sharing, communicating.

Above all, love each other deeply, because love covers over a multitude of sins. Offer hospitality to one and another without grumbling. use. 1 Peter 4:8-9 Let’s look at a few ways to love others through hospitality.

Be available.

While busyness is often the way we live these days, especially during the holidays, we need to make room on our calendars so we can be available to be hospitable with our time and our lives.

It doesn’t have to be perfect to be beautiful.

Your home doesn’t need to sparkle and shine before you invite people over. It doesn’t need to have fancy decorations or exquisite place settings for you to host a gathering. It can be simple and lived in with laundry piled in the corner and carpet stained from spilled juice, and it will be ok. More than the setting, being a non-anxious presence to the people you host will provide the rest they’re longing for.

Cook something.

There’s nothing like a homemade meal. It comforts and soothes and feeds both stomachs and souls. It may not be something you often do or like to do, or it may be the very thing that stresses you out the most about hosting. Learn to cook one good thing and serve that to whoever comes over. Feeding others is more about relationship than food. It’s nurturing and caring for them as a mother does, as God does for us. (You’ll find wonderful soups that can feed a crowd or last all week in this newsletter.)

Be the one to go over.

You may not be in a season where you can host others. Flip hospitality around and take dinner to other people’s houses. Take ingredients for a home cooked meal, coffee to a friend that needs a break, a pot of soup and crusty loaf of French bread. Hospitality can be mobile. Hospitality and entertaining are not the same thing, even though we often think of them as interchangeable. Hospitality is a practice. It is always being ready to help—even if your house is a mess. It’s giving, sharing, communicating. Above all, love each other deeply, because love covers over a multitude of sins. Offer hospitality to one another without grumbling. 1 Peter 4:8-9 Let’s look at a few ways to love others through hospitality.

Lisa Lewis is the author of Healthy Happy Cooking. Her cooking skills have been a part of First Place for Health wellness weeks and other events for many years. She provided recipes for 15 of the First Place for Health Bible studies and is a contributing author in Better Together and Healthy Holiday Living. She partners with community networks, including the Real Food Project, to provide free healthy cooking classes to communities.

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